Investment or cost?

I jumped on a John Maxwell Team mentors conference call this morning as my family and I made our way to Asheville so my wife could speak at a leadership event. As we went over the mountain, the call kept dropping, but we made it to the city just in time for me to catch the tail end of Roddy Galbraith as he delivered some incredible insight that has been bouncing around in my mind since. He said something to the effect of: “highly successful people view personal development as an investment, whereas lower functioning individuals see it as a cost.” Mic. Drop.

I’ll confess, I have spent more time in the latter group than I would prefer. There have been many times that I wanted to take the easiest, cheapest, or most conservative road possible. Sometimes this has been from laziness or skepticism, but most often it has been fear. A fear that it wouldn’t pan out–that I wouldn’t rise to even my own expectations. Well, who would bet on a leader who won’t even bet on himself?! The good news is that I reframed this when I joined the John Maxwell Team. I decided to hedge my bet on the one thing that I have the most control over: myself.

We have incredible power over the outcomes of our goals. It doesn’t matter if these goals are fitness, academic, vocational, relational, financial, or anything else. If we see working out as an investment toward health as opposed to a cost of our free time, there will be a return on the investment. If we frame higher education as an investment rather than merely a hoop to jump through, we will gain more insight. But, so long as personal development is framed as a cost in our minds, there won’t be any return.

This doesn’t mean frivolous spending on every next big thing pitched. What it means is that we step out with an abundance mindset. Real talk: when my wife wanted to hire an assistant to help manage her office, I certainly saw it as a cost; I was afraid that production would stay the same as the expenses climbed. I let fear and judgment assume that my wife would drop to half the work now that she had twice the hands, but she saw it as twice the production because there would be twice the hands. She was living in abundance while I was living in poverty.

How about you? Do you live in abundance or poverty? Do you see your own development as a cost or an investment? I can pretty much promise you that flipping this switch will change your life and that you will never be freer than the day you decide to bet on yourself.

Author: tomarbaugh

My mission is to courageously live an authentic life that influences other individuals to be their best selves.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s